Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world's leading harpsichordists








télécharger 48.23 Kb.
titreZuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world's leading harpsichordists
date de publication08.06.2018
taille48.23 Kb.
typeDocumentos
ar.21-bal.com > documents > Documentos
(Please find articles here from The Jewish Chronicle, The Times (London) and the BBC)

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

(UK)

December 23, 2016











Author Jessica Duchen writes on her blog:

JDCMB is author and journalist Jessica Duchen's Classical Music Blog. 


https://jessicamusic.blogspot.com/

ARTIST OF THE YEAR
Zuzana Ružičková, the only person ever to have made me fall in love with the harpsichord. She survived Terezín, Auschwitz, Belsen, the Czech communist regime and censure by leading lights of early music puritanism, but she is nearly 90 and her Bach - now released on CD for the first time, by Warner Classics - is the most radiant and life-affirming that I know. She is also my INTERVIEWEE OF THE YEAR. I have articles about her coming out shortly in tomorrow's JC, and another in BBC Music Magazine. I've met many inspiring people, but none more so than this remarkable soul.



October 16, 2016











BBC http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-38340648

Magazine 19 December 2016


The 'miraculous' life of Zuzana Ruzickova

By Rebecca Jones

Arts correspondent, BBC News





ALAMY
Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world's leading harpsichordists.


"I was not a strong child, but I was in love with music from the beginning," says Zuzana Ruzickova, who turns 90 next month.
Born in Czechoslovakia on 14 January 1927 to a prosperous Jewish family, she had a happy childhood but was sickly and suffered from tuberculosis.
One day, as a reward for getting better from her illness, she asked her parents for a piano and piano lessons. Doctors ordered her to rest, but eventually she got her way - and her teacher was so impressed she encouraged her to go to France to study with the world's top harpsichordist.
In 1939, though, the Nazis invaded Czechoslovakia. Not only was she unable to study in France, but three years later she and her family were deported to the Terezin labour camp.
"My childhood ended there," she says. Her grandparents and her father later died in the camp, along with thousands of other Jewish inmates. But, she insists, music helped her survive. She remembers writing down a small section of Bach's English Suite No 5 in E minor on a scrap of paper when she left Terezin in a cattle truck bound for Auschwitz. "I wanted to have a piece of Bach with me as a sort of talisman because I didn't know what was awaiting us."




What beckoned was more hardship. Her camp number at Auschwitz, 72389, which was tattooed on her arm, has faded now, but she has not forgotten it. She can also remember how "terribly frightened" she was.

Although she was only a teenager, she wishes she had been tougher.
"Seeing the gas chambers, the smoke every day. I'll never forgive myself that I always went in the evening to my mother and I wept and I said, 'I want to live, I don't want to die'," she remembers.
Zuzana Ruzickova says she knows she was due to be gassed on 6 June 1944 but she thinks she was saved by the D-Day landings, which took place early that day.
She then endured forced labour in Germany before being sent to the Bergen-Belsen death camp in 1945, where in yet another misfortune she contracted bubonic plague.
When she finally returned home to Czechoslovakia with her gravely ill mother her hands were in "an awful state", damaged from working in the fields and hauling bricks. She was advised to abandon any ambition for a musical career.
But, she says, "I couldn't live without music" and she practised the piano for 12 hours a day to make up for lost time.

"It is not enough to be an extraordinary musician," she says. "You have to be crazy. You have to have the feeling that you cannot live without music." Then in 1948 the Communists took power in Czechoslovakia, triggering more than 40 years of totalitarian rule.
"I couldn't really believe that there was another regime like the Nazis, so cruel, so stupid, so anti-Semitic. At first I was so naive. I thought this can't be true," she says.

Zuzana Ruzickova (front centre) lost many of her family in the Holocaust

Living in just two rooms of a small flat in Prague, the family were under constant surveillance. But, against all the odds, Zuzana Ruzickova went on to forge a distinguished career as a harpsichordist.
Her international breakthrough came in 1956 when she won the ARD International Music Competition in Munich. The Czechoslovak government allowed her to perform in competitions and concerts around the world because she was a lucrative source of foreign currency for the state. Between 1965 and 1975 she also became the first person to record Bach's complete works for keyboard.
Zuzana Ruzickova remains grateful to the composer, who, she says "played a big role in my recovering from my terrible experiences".
"Bach is very soothing. You always feel in his music that God is present somehow. And that, of course, helps."
She finally stopped performing in public in 2006, at the age of 79. She says she misses it "terribly". This coincided with the death of her husband, the composer Viktor Kalabis. "It completely changed my life," she says.
And now, in a final twist of fate, she can barely play the harpsichord. "My hands are not in order, not functioning properly. I have cancer and I had chemo," she says.
To mark her 90th birthday next month her complete Bach recordings have been re-issued. A new documentary about her, Zuzana: Music is Life will also be released.
Looking back over her tumultuous life and glittering career, Zuzana Ruzickova says she is not "proud" of anything.
But, she laughs, her greatest achievement is "to have lived until 90".


It was, she says, "miraculous that I survived".

e monde.svg

http://www.lemonde.fr/musiques/article/2016/12/05/zuzana-ruzickova-des-camps-de-travail-a-l-apaisement-du-clavecin_5043377_1654986.html

Musiques 05.12.2016

Zuzana Ruzickova, des camps de travail à l’apaisement du clavecin

Pour les 90 ans de la musicienne tchèque, Erato sort une version remasterisée de son intégrale Bach enregistrée entre 1964 et 1975.

uzana růžičková dans son appartement du quartier de vinohrady, à prague en novembre 2016.

Son nom – Ruzickova – est le premier en haut de la liste, 107, rue Slezska, dans le quartier de Vinohrady, à Prague. Rues larges, immeubles puissants, ici l’urbanisme fait la nique à la vieille ville baroque. C’est au cinquième étage que réside celle que les Français ont appelée « la grande dame du clavecin » : Zuzana Ruzickova enregistrait alors pour Erato l’intégrale des pièces pour clavecin seul de Bach, un corpus gravé entre 1964 et 1975 aujourd’hui remastérisé pour les 90 ans de la claveciniste tchèque, le 14 janvier 2017.

L’appartement est celui d’une vie. « J’ai emménagé ici il y a plus de cinquante ans », confirme-t-elle. Dans le salon peuplé de livres, disques, partitions et portraits, un sévère piano droit. L’étroite table ronde avec thé, café, chips et cookies n’a pas assez de place pour la bouilloire qui chuinte sur une commode. Deux clavecins dorment tête-bêche dans la pièce voisine. « J’ai arrêté de jouer en 2004 quand mon mari est tombé malade », dit-elle d’emblée.

Une « relation de cœur » avec la France

Le compositeur Viktor Kalabis est mort deux ans plus tard. Zuzana Ruzickova est tombée malade à son tour. Un cancer. « Avec la chimiothérapie, mes doigts ne marchent plus. Mais j’ai encore un étudiant, Mahan Esfahani, qui travaille avec moi depuis cinq ans et s’est installé ici, à Prague. Il était là il y a deux jours. » La vieille dame lève les mains comme pour mimer la musique envolée.

Zuzana Ruzickova a noté sur une feuille de papier les grandes étapes de sa « relation de cœur » avec la France. Le titre de chevalier des Arts et Lettres que lui a remis en 2003 l’ambassadeur de France à Prague. Ses débuts à Paris après que Marguerite Roesgen-Champion, membre du jury du prestigieux Concours international de Munich de 1956, invite la jeune lauréate tchèque, bourse à l’appui, à suivre ses cours. « La France a toujours été très importante dans ma vie », insiste-t-elle dans son français ancien.

« Mes mains étaient détruites »

Dès le début, à Pizen, sa ville natale en Bohême, sa professeure de piano avait convaincu ses parents d’envoyer leur fille adolescente étudier dans l’école de musique de Wanda Landowska à Saint-Leu-la-Forêt, non loin de Paris. « Mais les nazis sont arrivés, et tout a changé. Nous sommes partis à Terezin en janvier 1942. Mon père y est mort. Avec ma mère, nous avons été transférées fin 1943 à Oswiecim [Auschwitz en polonais]. » Zuzana Ruzickova évoquera sans pathos « l’esclavage dans les camps de travail près de Hambourg en juin 1944, le départ à Bergen-Belsen en février 1945 ».

« Quatre longues années. » La vieille dame a saisi le paquet de Pall Mall vertes. La boîte d’allumettes, vide. S’est levée pour en prendre une autre sur le bureau. « Quand nous sommes revenues, mes mains étaient complètement détruites. Ma professeure m’a conseillé d’aller étudier les langues à l’université. Mais la musique était toute ma vie, alors j’ai travaillé mon piano, Cramer, Czerny, dix à douze heures par jour. » Des volutes montent dans la pénombre. Zuzana Ruzickova fume depuis plus de soixante-dix ans, depuis les premières cigarettes données par les soldats britanniques après la libération de Bergen-Belsen, alors que la jeune fille, qui ne pesait plus que 35 kg, servait d’interprète dans l’hôpital où on l’avait soignée (typhus, paludisme, malnutrition). « Dix-sept personnes de ma famille sont mortes dans les camps. Que ma mère et moi soyons revenues tient à une centaine de miracles », dira-t-elle plus tard.


« IL Y A DANS LA MUSIQUE DE BACH UN ESPOIR QUI TRANSCENDE LA SOUFFRANCE. »
C’est à l’Académie des arts de Prague, intégrée quatre ans plus tôt, que Ruzickova passera définitivement du piano au clavecin, une fois créée la classe d’Oldrich Kredba en 1951, l’année où elle rencontre l’homme de sa vie, le pianiste et compositeur tchèque Viktor Kalabis. Les communistes sont au pouvoir depuis le coup de Prague en février 1948. Ni elle ni lui ne prendront leur carte au Parti communiste tchécoslovaque (PCT). La claveciniste n’a pas oublié les arguties à propos de l’instrument « religieux et féodal » dont elle fait désormais figure de pionnière. « La seule question était de savoir comment expliquer Bach au travers du prisme marxiste-léniniste. Un jour, je leur ai certifié que s’il avait été employé par le Parti, Bach n’aurait pas écrit des cantates pour l’Eglise, mais à la gloire de Lénine. »

Autorisée à quitter le pays pour sa propre carrière, Zuzana n’a jamais pu accompagner son mari, dont les œuvres étaient jouées à l’étranger. La peur du passage à l’Ouest. En 1957, elle doit même écourter son séjour parisien et rentrer à Prague alors que Manuel Rosenthal crée au Théâtre des Champs-Elysées le Concerto pour violoncelle op.8 de Viktor Kalabis.

Antisémitisme d’Etat

« Etre juif était toujours dangereux, à cause de l’antisémitisme d’Etat » : fin 1952, l’année du procès Slansky, purge destinée à éliminer quatorze membres du PCT, dont onze juifs, présentés comme des opposants au régime, Viktor Kalabis est devenu un « juif blanc », comme on appelait alors les non-juifs qui se mariaient avec des juifs. « Mon mari a été privé de son emploi à la Radio tchécoslovaque de Prague pendant trois ans pour avoir dit qu’il ne fallait pas s’occuper de politique, mais de musique. Alors, c’est moi qui ramenais les devises », lance-t-elle avec malice, avant d’ajouter : « Au fond, le communisme était très capitaliste ! »

Zuzana Ruzickova a fini sa tasse de café lilliputienne, petit bout de femme coquette en tunique et pantalon noir, maquillée, bijoutée, immensément jeune et vive, à l’instar de la jeune fille de 15 ans qui mentit sur son âge pour échapper aux chambres à gaz d’Auschwitz. « Mon mari m’a obligée à parler. J’avais une telle colère ! Grâce à lui, j’ai pu surmonter le traumatisme de l’Holocauste. Je jouais Beethoven au piano, mais c’est Bach qui m’a apaisée. Il y a dans sa musique un espoir qui transcende la souffrance. »

« Ramener Bach dans son pays »

Le domaine musical de Zuzana Ruzickova s’étend naturellement du XVIe au XVIIe siècle, mais touche aussi à la musique contemporaine. Que ce soit le répertoire français (Couperin, Rameau, Poulenc), tchèque (Benda, Martinu) et italien (Vivaldi, Frescobaldi), mais aussi les virginalistes anglais (Purcell) sans oublier Haendel, Haydn, Bartok, Falla, ainsi que les pièces pour clavecin composées pour elle par Viktor Kalabis. Mais c’est avec la « Sarabande »de la Partita n° 3 recopiée sur un bout de papier qu’elle quittera Terezin, avec Bach encore, et qu’elle se rendra en Allemagne dix ans après la guerre. « Pour moi, il était fondamental de ramener Bach dans son pays, de montrer que cette culture n’avait pas disparu », affirme-t-elle, non sans évoquer ce jour terrible, au Festival d’Ansbach, où elle avait su qu’Albert Speer, l’architecte du führer, était dans la salle.

Le jour tombe : Zuzana Ruzickova accepte de réveiller ses clavecins. « Ils sont très désaccordés », s’excuse-t-elle en plaquant des accords sur l’une des copies du facteur flamand Ruckers. La musicienne a touché dans sa vie beaucoup d’instruments, mais celui de ses rêves reste « celui de Rafael Puyana, un clavecin à trois claviers du facteur hambourgeois Hieronymus Albrecht Hass, de 1740, que j’ai joué au Festival de Cluny où il l’avait apporté ».


SI JE DEVAIS REJOUER BACH MAINTENANT, JE LE FERAIS PLUS RAPIDE, ET AVEC PLUS DE FRIVOLITÉ
Au mur, un disque de platine obtenu chez Supraphon – une seconde mouture du Clavier bien tempéré enregistrée en 1990, les sonates pour violon et clavecin gravées en duo avec Josef Suk, les concertos avec Vaclav Neumann à la tête des Prague Chamber Soloists, l’ensemble qu’ils ont cofondé en 1962.

La petite fille de Terezin qui chantait dans les chœurs du Brundibar, de Hans Krasa, n’a pas pardonné à son pays de lui avoir si longtemps refusé un poste de professeur à l’Académie de Prague, alors que la « grande dame du clavecin » enseignait à Bratislava, Zurich, Stuttgart, Cracovie, Budapest, Riga et Tokyo. La vieille dame tient dans ses mains le coffret reçu de Paris quelques jours plus tôt – Bach, The Complete Keyboard Works. Si elle est contente du résultat ? « Jamais !,s’exclame-t-elle. On dit que les musiciens adoptent généralement des tempos plus lents en vieillissant, mais, si je devais rejouer Bach maintenant, je le ferais plus rapide, et avec plus de frivolité. »

Bach, The Complete Keyboard Works. Avec Zuzana Ruzickova (clavecin). Coffret de 20 CD, Erato/Warner Classics


Le Monde



For more information about the new 2017 film – ZUZANA: MUSIC IS LIFE please visit www.zuzanathemovie.com
For more information on the life and music of Zuzana Ruzickova and her composer husband Viktor Kalabis – and links to more media articles - please visit www.kalabismusic.org
For an article about Zuzana and human rights please visit www.frankvogl.com



similaire:

Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world\Résumé : (1043 caractères, espaces compris)
«L’homme est un document comme les autres : du World Wide Web au World Life Web»

Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world\Venez nous rencontrer au salon Embedded World

Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world\Unusual, ecological and typical accomodations World Tour

Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world\As every year, Sodikart were prominent at the Offenbach Kartmesse...

Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world\Championnat du monde du chocolat
«World Chocolate Masters», une compétition prestigieuse dans laquelle l’habileté et la créativité sont essentiels

Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world\Is a great French audio magazine for improving listening comprehension...

Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world\Cours Pourquoi la programmation orientée objet? Concept d’objet Caractéristiques...

Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world\L’intelligence est porteuse de valeur ajoutée
«Globe for Frankfurt and the World» avec des films attractifs, des vidéos, de la musique et des débats

Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world\Communiqué de presse
«atp world Tour Masters 1000», regroupant les 9 plus grands tournois atp et accueillant les meilleurs joueurs de tennis mondiaux

Zuzana Ruzickova endured three concentration camps in World War Two, including Auschwitz, and was persecuted by the Communists in Czechoslovakia in the years that followed. But not only did she survive, she also went on to become one of the world\A film produced and directed by Wim Wenders and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado
«industry»; Exodus (2000) depicts the situation of millions of refugees throughout the world in their very different contexts. He...








Tous droits réservés. Copyright © 2016
contacts
ar.21-bal.com